• Castel Rigone, Week 21: What Comes Around

    Pedar W. Foss:

    Re-blogging from Shades of Umbria, 28 Jan. 2014. This is the 14th in a series of posts on the ethics of competition, focusing on Castel Rigone Calcio, and part of the ‘Ethics of Combat‘ category on quemdixerechaos. This blog series completes a DePauw University Faculty Fellowship that examines how and why rules and customs develop for, and in, combat and competition.

    Originally posted on Shades of Umbria:

    Two long shots stretch the netting inside the goal. One skids almost 30 yards along the ground, denting the tips of weary grass and divots of mud. The keeper Zucconi, just entered as a substitute, positions himself on the right side, but — his view shielded — he dives too late, eyes shoving his head back as he twists to watch the ball skid past. The other steams nearly 40 yards into the upper right corner as Zucconi flies helplessly past. Both come off the feet of a 22-yr. old Portuguese no. 10, Pedro Miguel Costa Ferreira, who was shooting at nearly every opportunity, and whose persistence (or selfishness) paid off in the second half for A.C.R. Messina in their 2-0 defeat of Castel Rigone. The YouTube highlights of the game (below) have now had more views than the 1000 who watched…

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  • Castel Rigone, Weeks 19-20: Bumps

    Pedar W. Foss:

    Re-blogging from Shades of Umbria, 23 Jan. 2014. This is the 13th in a series of posts on the ethics of competition, focusing on Castel Rigone Calcio, and part of the ‘Ethics of Combat‘ category on quemdixerechaos. This blog series completes a DePauw University Faculty Fellowship that examines how and why rules and customs develop for, and in, combat and competition.

    Originally posted on Shades of Umbria:

    Chieti before the game

    Bubble Football “: one way to cushion the impact of ‘bumps’.

    Since Shakespeare‘s day, ‘bump‘ has meant a protuberance, something raised above the normal level. In a road, a bump forces one to slow down. During an election, a bump is more like a bounce. In the late 20th century, as data visualization became more common, words were commandeered to describe meaningful patterns or events. For instance, a significant change in a graphic trend-line (since at least 1980) became a ‘bump’ in the polls. Soccer has good and bad bumps too.

    Received wisdom says that when a team fires its manager, almost always because of poor results, the team revives, plays better, and often wins its next game, or several games. In other words, the team will enjoy a positive ‘bump’. The general reasoning is that players, wishing to impress the new manager, will try harder…

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  • Translating Pliny’s letters about Vesuvius, pt. 9. Shuddering to Remember

    Relief from the House of L. Caecilius Iucundus (V.1.26) at Pompeii depicting the earthquake of AD 62

    The world turned topsy-turvy: detail of a relief from Pompeii depicting the earthquake of AD 62/3 toppling the Temple of Jupiter (see below for details)

    6.20.1-3: Shuddering to Remember

    This post belongs to a serialized translation and commentary of Pliny the Younger’s letters (6.16 and 6.20) to the historian Tacitus about the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. This is the first installment for letter 6.20, and the ninth overall.

    I  provide the Latin (using Mynors’ 1963 Oxford Classical Text [OCT]), and then work through it with a translation, dissection of grammatical constructions, and discussion of what the letters tell us. Other pages in the series detail the manuscript tradition and the cast of characters in the two letters. The Codex Laurentianus Mediceus for letter 6.20 can be viewed here Plut. 47.36, p. 186.

    The Latin is in italics; English translation follows in Roman text, indented, and then commentary in brown text. Parentheses indicate (‘understood’) words that are not explicit in the Latin. My purpose here is as much to look at the process of translating as to provide another translated product. So I tend to err on the side of a technical rather than a fluid English translation.

    The Younger Pliny has already written one account of the eruption (6.16) in order to describe the death of his uncle, Pliny the Elder. He now pens a follow-on to Cornelius Tacitus about his own, and his mother’s, flight from the volcanic storm.

    C. PLINIUS TACITO SUO S.

    Gaius Plinius greets his dear (friend) Tacitus.

    C‘ is the abbreviation for the common name ‘Caius‘, or ‘Gaius‘. ‘S‘ is short for ‘salutem‘, and goes with the gapped verb ‘dicit‘ to mean ‘says greeting’. ‘Suo‘ is a term of affectionate familiarity often used to denote ‘one’s own’ (i.e., family and friends) This address is identical to that of 6.16.

    1 Ais te adductum litteris quas exigenti tibi de morte avunculi mei scripsi, cupere cognoscere, quos ego Miseni relictus (id enim ingressus abruperam) non solum metus verum etiam casus pertulerim. ‘Quamquam animus meminisse horret, …incipiam.’

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  • Castel Rigone, Week 18: True Grit

    Pedar W. Foss:

    Re-blogging from Shades of Umbria, 7 Jan. 2014. This is the 12th in a series of posts on the ethics of competition, focusing on Castel Rigone Calcio, and part of the ‘Ethics of Combat‘ category on quemdixerechaos. This blog series completes a DePauw University Faculty Fellowship that examines how and why rules and customs develop for, and in, combat and competition.

    Originally posted on Shades of Umbria:

    Chieti before the game

    Chieti warming up in the cold and wet

    There’s a quality to players that coaches love to see here; they call it “grinta,” or “grit” — the will to focus one’s attention and energies towards a task despite all obstacles and conditions. Simon’s coach constantly talks to his team about playing with grinta. Castel Rigone showed it after the holiday break and earned three points in their fifth straight win, 1-0 over Chieti (who had beat them 3-1 in the very first game of the season back in August).

    I took Simon to see the match; it had poured that morning, and the pitch was full of water puddles; the grounds crew worked with squeegees and augers to try to drain the water and dry the mud. The all-white kit of the home side was brown almost immediately, however. In those first minutes, Chieti launched a direct assault…

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  • ROMARCH: 2014 Classical Summer School, American Academy in Rome

    IMG_0093Now Accepting Applications for the 2014 Classical Summer School at the American Academy in Rome

    This six-week program is designed to provide qualified graduate students, mature undergraduates, and middle school, high school, and two-year college teachers with a well-founded understanding of the growth and development of the city of Rome through a careful study of material remains and literary sources.

    The program will run June 16 to July 25, 2014. For the 2014 program year, the organizers have made every effort to reduce costs to participants and to enhance their interaction with the intellectual community of the Academy. The overall cost of the program represents a 15% decrease from the previous program year. The application deadline is January 20, 2014. Scholarship opportunities are available from both the Academy and numerous Classical societies (CAAS, CAMWS, Eta Sigma Phi etc.). 

    For more information, go to http://aarome.org/apply/summer-programs or email the Director of the Summer School Dr. Genevieve Gessert at gessert.aarcss@gmail.com

  • Castel Rigone, Weeks 15-16-17: Card Games

    Pedar W. Foss:

    Re-blogging from Shades of Umbria, 24 Dec. 2013. This is the 11th in a series of posts on the ethics of competition, focusing on Castel Rigone Calcio, and part of the ‘Ethics of Combat‘ category on quemdixerechaos. This blog series completes a DePauw University Faculty Fellowship that examines how and why rules and customs develop for, and in, combat and competition.

    Originally posted on Shades of Umbria:

    Luca Ubaldi in action for Castel Rigone v. Vigor Lamezia, from  Umbria 24

    All last week, the Giornale dell’Umbria published stories on Castel Rigone going for a ‘poker’. A ‘poker’ in Italian means a hand with four aces. In sporting terms, this indicates either scoring four goals in a game, or a string of four successive wins. On Sunday, the team earned that club-record fourth win in a row. A 1-0 victory away at Sorrento Calcio, after defeating other strong opposition (first-place Teramo and seventh-place Vigor Lamezia), vaulted Castel Rigone into fifth place at the midway point of the season, firmly within the survival zone of the top eight teams. (In Italian soccer, tiebreakers for teams level on points are: first, head-to-head record; second, overall goal difference.)

    LegaProHalfwayStandings Standings at the winter break, from Lega Pro . G = games played; V = victories; P = draws; P = losses…

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