• ROMARCH: Linked Ancient World Data Institute

    NEH-FUNDED LINKED ANCIENT WORLD DATA INSTITUTE (LAWDI): Applications due Monday, February, 18, 2013.

    Drew University and New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 30st to June 1st, 2013. The venue will be the Drew University campus in New Jersey. “Linked Open Data” is an approach to the creation of digital resources that emphasizes connections between diverse information on the basis of published and stable web addresses (URIs) that identify common concepts and individual items. LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources. LAWDI’s intellectual scope is the Ancient Mediterranean and Ancient Near East, two fields in which a large and increasing number of digital resources is available, with rich coverage of the archaeology, literature and history of these regions. Continue reading

  • ROMARCH: Heraclea Sintica Conference, call for papers


    Heraclea Sintica: from Hellenistic polis to Roman civitas (4th c. BC – 6th c. AD)

    Dates: September 19-21, 2013;
    Location: Petrich, Bulgaria; Hotel Bats.
    Organizers: National Institute of Archaeology with Museum at Bulgarian
    Academy of Sciences, American Research Center in Sofia, Museum of
    History-Petrich
    Sponsors: American Research Center in Sofia, Municipality of Petrich

    This international conference will bring together leading scholars to present recent work on the site of Heraclea Sintica, situated near the village of Rupite, ca. 12 km northeast of Petrich, SW Bulgaria. The presentations will be arranged in thematic sections devoted to particular topics, such as, but not limited to:

    1. Historical topography of Heraclea and its city territory, including necropoleis;
    2. Recent archaeological excavations on the site;
    3. Diachronic surveys on literary sources and epigraphic documents;
    4. Religious monuments and associated cult practices;
    5. Patterns of coin circulation as related to economy and local markets.

    Continue reading