• ROMARCH: Archaeologia Bulgarica ХХIII 2019 #2 Contents

    Archaeologia BulgaricaArchaeologia Bulgarica ХХIII 2019 #2
    table of contents
    ARTICLES

    Reho, M.: Two оinochoai by the Nikias Painter in the National
    Archaeological Museum in Sofia…1

    Georgiev, P. Y.: Archaeometric Research and Reconstruction of a Bronze
    Vessel from Kitova Burial Mound near the Village of Krushare,
    Municipality of Sliven….27

    Sharankov, N. / Hristov, I.: A Milestone of Emperor Philip the Arab from
    the Road Oescus – Philippopolis Found at the Eastern Wall of the
    castellum of Sostra…..57

    Dana, D. / Moreau, D. / Kirov, S. / Valeriev, I.: A New Greek Dedication
    from the Sanctuary of Telerig among the spolia at Zaldapa….71

    Doncheva, S.: Early Medieval Slotted Openwork Strap Ends with “S”-Shape
    Double Palmettes from Northeastern Bulgaria…..79

    Regards,
    Lyudmil Vagalinski (editor)
    https://www.facebook.com/Archaeologia-Bulgarica-811557715855220/
    www.archaeologia-bulgarica.com

  • ROMARCH: Oscar Broneer Traveling Fellowship, 2020-21

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    OSCAR BRONEER TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP, 2020-2021
    Deadline: March 15, 2020

    The American Academy in Rome and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens award the Oscar Broneer Traveling Fellowship to encourage the study of the Greco-Roman world.

    Purpose: The Fellowship will be awarded for research in Greece and Italy in alternate years. For the 2020-2021 academic year, the Fellowship will be awarded for research in Italy. It is expected that the Fellow will use the American Academy in Rome (AAR) as a base from which to pursue work through trips to sites, museums, or repositories of materials relevant to the Fellow’s research.
    EligibilityFor the 2020-2021 fellowship year, only applicants previously at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) are eligible for this Fellowship based at the AAR and for research based in Rome and Italy. Applicants must have spent a minimum of one month as a Member of the ASCSA at the time of application. Candidates must have an approved dissertation proposal or, if they already hold the Ph.D., they should be at the beginning of their teaching career and without tenure. Projects may focus on any period of study in the humanities, although preference will be given to topics dealing with classical antiquity.
    Terms: The Fellowship is awarded to one individual per year. It may be held at any time during the 2020-2021 academic year for a minimum of three and a maximum of six months. The award is for a maximum of $30,000, and is meant to cover expenses including housing at the host institution, travel (only one round-trip excursion from home base in U.S. or Europe to Rome and travel within Italy will be funded), and living expenses. Support from the host institution includes access to research facilities, invitations to various scholarly and other events, and access to other activities offered by the host institution. The award amount will be determined by the applicant’s approved budget. Applicants are urged to explore supplementary sources of support.  A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the AAR and ASCSA expect that copies of all publications that result from research conducted at AAR and ASCSA be contributed to their relevant libraries.
    Application: The application will consist of the candidate’s curriculum vitae, a detailed research proposal (maximum of three pages single spaced), a plan for travel connected with the project, a budget for all expenses including travel, housing, food, fees, and other living expenses, and proposed dates. Applicants should consult with the host institution for costs associated with housing, food, and fees. The selection committee, in evaluating the candidate’s proposal, will determine how reasonable and relevant the travel plan and budget appear in relation to the proposed research and the period of time requested for the Fellowship. Submit all application materials, including three letters of recommendation to the American Academy in Rome. Materials may be sent via email to Shawn Miller, Program Director at s.miller@aarome.org, or via ground mail addressed to Oscar Broneer Traveling Fellowship, c/o American Academy in Rome, 7 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022.
  • ROMARCH: Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute Fellowships, 2020-21

    THE CYPRUS AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CAARI) in Nicosia, Cyprus, welcomes scholars and students specializing in archaeology, history, and culture of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean. CAARI is located in central Nicosia close to the Cyprus Museum and the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus (both with major libraries), as well as the main business and commercial district. In addition to hostel accommodation for a total of twelve residents, the institute has excellent research facilities: a 10,000-volume library, comprehensive map and artifact collections, archival material, and facilities for Internet, scanning, and photography. For further information please visit www.caari.org

    Recipients of fellowships are required to spend time as residents of CAARI and to submit a written report for the CAARI newsletter.

    Apply for the following fellowships at: http://orc.fellowships.fluidreview.com

    For questions please contact usa.office@caari.org.cy

    GRADUATE STUDENT FELLOWSHIPS

    Deadline for CAARI graduate student fellowships is December 9, 2019.

    The Danielle Parks Memorial Fellowship
    Danielle Parks, author of The Roman Coinage of Cyprus (Nicosia, 2004), directed excavations at the Amathus Gate Cemetery. She first came to Cyprus as an Anita Cecil O’Donovan Fellow. Her death as a young scholar in 2006, deeply felt by the wide circle of her colleagues and friends, is memorialized here by a fellowship designed to open the world of Cypriot culture to young scholars.

    This is a fellowship of US $2,000 for a graduate student of any nationality who needs to work in Cyprus to further his/her research on a subject of relevance to Cypriot archaeology and culture. The purpose of the fellowship is to help cover travel to and living expenses in Cyprus. Applications are invited especially from students of Hellenistic and Roman Cyprus. During his/her stay, the fellow is expected to give a presentation at CAARI on a subject related to his/her research. The fellow will periodically keep the Director of CAARI apprised of his/her research activities. The fellow will acknowledge CAARI and the Danielle Parks Memorial Fellowship in any publication that emerges from the research carried during the fellowship. Residence at CAARI is required.

    And more….

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  • ROMARCH: ACOR in Amman, 2020-21 Fellowships

    ANNOUNCEMENT OF AMERICAN CENTER OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH IN AMMAN FELLOWSHIPS
    2020–2021

     

    Deadline for the following fellowships is February 1, 2020

    NEH Fellowship: Maximum single award of ten months for a scholar who has a Ph.D. or has completed his or her professional training. Other awards for minimum of four to nine months. Fields of research include, but are not limited to: modern and classical languages, linguistics, literature, history, jurisprudence, philosophy, archaeology, heritage studies, comparative religion, ethics, and the history, criticism, and theory of the arts. Social and political scientists are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals living in the U.S. three years immediately preceding the application deadline. The award for ten months is $50,000 of which $32,000 is for stipend and travel and the remainder is for ACOR room and board. Shorter award periods are prorated accordingly (i.e., six months award for $30,000 includes $19,200 for stipend and travel); residency at ACOR is required. The award must be used between June 15, 2020 and December 31, 2021. Funding for this fellowship provided by the National Endowment of the Humanities Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutes (FPIRI).

    ACOR-CAORC Post-Doctoral Fellowship: Two or more two- to six-month fellowships for post-doctoral scholars and scholars with a terminal degree in their field, pursuing research or publication projects in the natural and social sciences, humanities, and associated disciplines relating to the Middle East. U.S. citizenship required. Maximum award is $32,400. Awards must be used between June 15, 2020 and December 31, 2021 and Fellows must reside at ACOR. Funding for this fellowship is provided by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

    And more…

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  • ROMARCH: Oxford Workshop: Textile Art in the Graeco-Roman World

    Oxford Workshop: Textile Art in the Graeco-Roman World

    Thursday 26th and Friday 27th September 2019

    Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Oxford OX1 3LU

    UPDATE: WORKSHOP WEBCAST

    Live webcast links are now available on our website (www.carc.ox.ac.uk) for this event on Thursday 26th and Friday 27th September at The Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’ (OX1 3LU).  These will be live shortly before each session starts.  Places to attend in person are still available and are free but please book by emailing: carc@classics.ox.ac.uk

    Edited podcasts will be available at a later date also via our website.

    Please be aware that our website will be temporarily unavailable for ten minutes early on the morning of the 26th whilst our IT services are doing an update.  All should be back to normal for the start of the workshop.

    The programme for our 2019 CARC workshop, kindly supported by Jean-David Cahn and Tony Michaels, is available on our website.  Textile Art in the Graeco-Roman World will focus on the visual imagery of ancient textiles from Archaic Greece to late antiquity, asking questions about a fundamentally important art tradition which we glimpse through extraordinary chance survivals and representations in other media. Subjects will have a wide chronological and geographical range, but will revolve around a shared set of art-historical and archaeological questions.

    Download the draft abstract here.

    Download the draft programme here. Please check the website for updates and time changes.

    Classical Art Research Centre

    www.carc.ox.ac.uk

    carc@classics.ox.ac.uk

    Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies
    66 St Giles’, Oxford, OX1 3LU

    Tel: +44 (0)1865 278083

    Fax: +44 (0)1865 610237

  • ROMARCH: Ancient Britain and Classical Art: Oxford Workshop

    Ancient Britain and Classical Art, 27th-28th September 2018 – draft programme for CARC workshop now out!

    The provisional programme is now available and we are taking free bookings for the 2018 CARC workshop, ‘Ancient Britain and Classical Art’, to be held in the Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Oxford OX1 3LU on Thursday 27th and Friday 28th September.

    Generously supported by Jean-David Cahn and Tony Michaels, this workshop examines the complex relationship between the visual cultures of ancient Britain and the Graeco-Roman traditions of the Continent and the Mediterranean over a period of almost a thousand years. Considering not only the period of Roman Britain but also the art of the pre-Roman Iron Age and the early Anglo-Saxon period, the workshop aims to stimulate dialogue across disciplinary boundaries.

    The full draft programme and abstract are available to download on http://www.carc.ox.ac.uk/events/default.htm

    Please check for updates as the date of the workshop approaches.

    The workshop is free and all are welcome to attend, but please book a place by emailing carc@classics.ox.ac.uk

     

    Classical Art Research Centre

    www.carc.ox.ac.uk

    carc@classics.ox.ac.uk


    Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies
    66 St Giles’, Oxford, OX1 3LU

    Tel: +44 (0)1865 278083

    Fax: +44 (0)1865 610237

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • ROMARCH: Register for The Connected Past, Oxford 2018

    cropped-logo_website_headingREGISTRATION OPEN

    The Connected Past Oxford 2018

    Registration for The Connected Past Oxford 2018 is open now.
    A two-day international inter-disciplinary conference featuring 46 talks about network research on a wide variety of topics including Archaeology, Physics, History and Computer Science.
    When? 6-7 December 2018
    Where? University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    Keynotes? Dr. Nathalie Riche (Microsoft Research) and Dr. Matthew Peeples (Arizona State University)
    How do social networks evolve over huge time-scales? How did geography constrain or enhance the development of past social networks? These are fundamental questions in both the study of the human past and network research, yet our ability to answer them is severely hampered by the limited development of spatiotemporal network methods. PastNet is an inter-disciplinary network that aims to stimulate the development and application of such methods through networking meetings, a conference and a workshop.
    Formal network methods are increasingly commonly applied in a wide range of disciplines to study phenomena as diverse as the connectivity of neurons in the human brain, terrorist networks, a billion interlinked Facebook profiles, and power grids. Despite this diversity and the decades-long tradition of using network methods in the social sciences, physics and computer science, the development of techniques for the study of spatial networks and long-term network change has so far been largely neglected. Network research is also becoming more common in disciplines concerned with the study of past human behaviour: archaeology, classics and history. These disciplines have a strong tradition in exploring long-term human behavioural change and spatial phenomena, despite being forced to use fragmentary textual and material sources as indirect evidence of such phenomena.
    By bringing together network researchers from archaeology, classics, computer science, digital humanities, history, mathematics, network science, oriental studies, physics, psychology, and sociology, The Connected Past 2018 conference in Oxford aims to foster cross-disciplinary exchange to push network research further. The historical disciplines will contribute new spatiotemporal approaches and datasets to network research, whereas the traditional network research disciplines will further stimulate the critical application of network approaches to the study of the human past.
    This event is made possible thanks to the generous support of The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) and is organised by the TORCH research network PastNet: https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/themes/pastnet-network
    Presentations will be delivered on the topic of spatial and temporal network approaches, addressing the challenges posed by the use of or apply network approaches in historical/archaeological research contexts, with case studies drawn from all periods and places. Topics might include, but are not limited to:
    • Spatial networks
    • Temporal networks
    • Archaeological network research
    • Historical network research
    • Missing and incomplete data in archaeological and historical networks
    • What kinds of data can archaeologists and historians use to reconstruct past networks and what kinds of issues ensue?
    • Formal network analysis vs qualitative network approaches: pros, cons, potential, limitations
    Hope to see you all there!

  • ROMARCH: 2018 Archaeological Field School: Trasimeno (Italy)

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    The Trasimeno Archaeology Field School of the Umbra Institute in Perugia provides a curricular concentration in Archaeology and History based in Castiglione del Lago on the shores of Lake Trasimeno between Umbria and Tuscany.

    The Excavation Siteimg_5568
    The fieldwork takes place on an archaeological area located on the shores of Lake Chiusi, on the Umbrian-Tuscan border just a few miles from Castiglione del Lago and Lake Trasimeno. On fieldwork days, a bus will take students, faculty, and staff to the site for a full-day’s work and research. Lunch will be on-site, and students will return home in the mid-afternoon. Alternating days will be spent in class, at the local museum, or on field trips to nearby sites of interest. This archaeological site was only recently discovered and this project is the first scientific investigation. After a season of survey and two seasons of excavation, findings indicate the presence of a 2nd-c BC-3rd c. AD Roman villa, including a bath complex, tile manufacturing, and a possible Roman road. The Archaeological Field School is a long term project run in cooperation with local institutions. Every summer, students contribute to the uncovering of the site and the display of artifacts in the expanding archaeological museum of Castiglione del Lago.

    The Town 

    Castiglione del Lago is a charming medieval town in Umbria, located on top of a small peninsula along the southwestern shores of Lake Trasimeno. It featured in a recent article by The Guardian as one of the best lakeside towns in Europe.  A member of the prestigious I Borghi più Belli d’Italia Association (The Most Beautiful Villages in Italy, www.borghitalia.it), Castiglione lies among renowned historical cities, such as Orvieto, Chiusi, Arezzo, Cortona and Perugia. All Field School participants stay in Castiglione during the summer term, only a few miles away from Perugia and easily accessible either by bus or train.

    The Academic Program

    The Field School consists of two courses, one theoretical and one practical, both held in Castiglione del Lago. The program aims to provide students with a comprehensive overview of up-to-date theories and methods of archaeological research and fieldwork as applied to the civilizations that shaped the history and culture of central Italy. The Field School runs for 6 weeks. Program dates for the summer 2017 will be May 26th (arrival in Italy) to July 7th (departure). 

    The course ARFW 350: Archaeological Field Workshop is an archaeology practicum. Students will work alongside professional archaeological staff to gain fundamental skills in archaeological research and apply them to the project.
    Course Credit: 3

    The course ARCL 340: Archaeology in Central Italy: The Etruscan and Roman Heritageintroduces students to the region’s history and heritage, and provides context for the archaeological research project.
    Course Credit: 3

    Both courses are non-prerequisite and mandatory. They include fieldtrips to various archaeological and cultural sites, including an overnight trip to Rome. Fieldtrips are designed to enhance student understanding of the territory’s history, while also providing the opportunity to study and visit neighboring archaeological sites and major museum collections.

    Click on the host website: http://www.umbra.org/academics/archaeology-summer/

    Or visit the project blog, including links to publications: https://archaeotrasimeno.wordpress.com

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