• ROMARCH: Call for Papers, The Connected Past 2017: the Future of Past Networks

    Call for papers The Connected Past 2017, August 24-25th 2017, Bournemouth University (UK)
    The Connected Past 2017: The Future of Past Networks?
     
    August 24-25th 2017 
    Bournemouth University (UK)
     
    August 22-23rd 2017 Practical Networks Workshop
     
    The Connected Past 2017 is a multi-disciplinary, international two-day conference that aims to provide a friendly and informal platform for exploring the use of network research in the study of the human past. 
     
    It will be preceded by a two-day practical workshop offering hands-on experience with a range of network science methods.
     
    Deadline call for papers: May 21, 2017
    Notification of acceptance: May 29, 2017
     
    Conference registration (includes coffee breaks and lunch): £35
    Workshop registration (includes coffee breaks): £20
     
    Keynotes: Eleftheria Paliou and discussant Chris Tilley (tbc)
    Organisers: Fiona Coward, Anna Collar & Tom Brughmans
     
    Call for Papers
    Five years have passed since the first Connected Past conference (Southampton 2012) brought together scholars working in archaeology, history, physics, mathematics and computer science to discuss how network methods, models and thinking might be used to enhance our understanding of the human past. Much has happened in these intervening years: applications of network analysis have expanded rapidly; a number of collected volumes dealing explicitly with network analysis of the past have been published (e.g. The Connected Past, OUP 2016; Special Issue of the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 2015; Network Analysis in Archaeology, OUP 2013); and several dedicated groups of scholars are thriving, including the Connected Past itself which hosted conferences in Paris and London, but also the Historical Network Research group, Res-Hist and others. The Connected Past 2017 will provide an opportunity to take stock of the developments of the past five years and to discuss the future of network research in archaeology and history. How will new network models, methods and thinking shape the ways we study the past? 
     
    We welcome submissions of abstracts that address the challenges posed by the use of or apply network approaches in historical/archaeological research contexts, welcoming case studies drawn from all periods and places. Topics might include, but are not limited to: 
     
            Missing and incomplete data in archaeological and historical networks
            Networks, space and place
            Network change over time
            What kinds of data can archaeologists and historians use to reconstruct past networks and what kinds of issues ensue?
            Categories in the past vs categories in our analysis: etic or emic, pre-determined or emergent?
            Formal network analysis vs qualitative network approaches: pros, cons, potential, limitations
     
    Please submit your abstract limited to 250 words before midnight (GMT) of May 21st 2017 to connectedpast2017@gmail.com  
     
    NB. If there is sufficient demand, we will endeavour to organise a crêche for delegates’ children (under 3). An extra fee may be payable for this, although fee-waivers may be available in certain circumstances. Further details would be provided in due course. In order to allow us to assess demand, please let us know in advance if this would be useful for you.  
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    Posted by: Tom Brughmans <tom.brughmans@yahoo.com>

  • ROMARCH: Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World iPad app; Review

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    Barrington Atlas App splash screen

    Princeton University Press has launched its iPad app version of the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, as we noted here on Oct. 31. The app has been made available for $19.95 on iTunes. The Barrington Facebook page includes recent news and reviews about the release. Princeton provided a copy of the app for this review. Testing was done on a 4th-generation 128 GB iPad running iOS 7.0.4 after a clean restart.

    When the print version of the Barrington Atlas was published in 2000, the fruit of a multiyear international collaboration, it redressed a problem that had bedeviled the latter 20th-century: a lack of up-to-date, accurate, and visually informative/attractive (yes, I link those two attributes) maps for the classical world. Murray’s Small Classical Atlas, a short but distinguished accomplishment of Victorian cartography popular in schools, had seen its last update in 1917 (though reprints appeared through the 1950s).

    Hammond’s 1981 Atlas, from eBay

    The efforts of van der Heyden and Scullard (1962) and Hammond (1981) were useful as references, but their visual qualities (too few maps, and those reduced to atopographic colored line-drawings in the former; sepia monochrome in the latter) left much to be desired. The Facts-on-File Cultural Atlases released from 1980-1990 (“Greek World,” “Roman World,” “Egypt,” and “Mesopotamia and the ancient Near East”) were examples of the encyclopedia-style that prevailed in that decade, with lots of insets, photos, short descriptions, timelines and essays — an integrated approach that had many merits, but which were ultimately limited in sheer cartographic utility.

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