• ROMARCH: Job Posting, Programs Assistant, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

    POSITION AVAILABLE at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens:

    Full-time Programs Assistant

    The American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA), a non-profit overseas research institution, is seeking a qualified individual to work in the U.S. administrative office of the School in Princeton, NJ. The ASCSA offers a pleasant, energetic environment with dedicated professionals. Position is full time, 35 hours per week beginning June 1, 2017.

    The principal duties will involve general clerical support, including the preparation of meeting materials, mailings, general correspondence, support for communications related to Committee work, database entry as needed (Raiser’s Edge), as well as other office duties. S/he will report to the Programs Administrator.

    Qualifications: B.A. or Associate’s degree. Excellent computer, word processing, and spreadsheet skills (Microsoft Office). Excellent communications skills and administrative support experience in an office setting.

    Annual salary of $30,000, plus benefits.
    The American School of Classical Studies is an EO/AA employer.

    To apply, submit a CV or resume, and names of two recommenders. A cover letter is optional and highly recommended. Applications for the position should be submitted via the online form at:
    https://ascsa.wufoo.com/forms/fulltime-programs-assistant/ 

    Applications will be received until May 15, 2017.
     
    Here is the bulletin:
    ——————–
    Alicia M. Dissinger, PhD
    Programs Administrator
    American School of Classical Studies at Athens
    6-8 Charlton Street
    Princeton, NJ 08540-5232
    adissinger@ascsa.org
    tel. 609-454-6819 – direct dial
    fax 609-924-0578
  • ROMARCH: Oxford CARC workshop: Problems of Chronology in Gandharan Art

    Apollo and Daphne: Gandharan schist dish from the Met

    CARC is delighted to announce that the draft programme for our first international ‘Gandhara Connections’ workshop is now out. For the programme and other information see our website: www.carc.ox.ac.uk

    or the project microsite: www.carc.ox.ac.uk/GandharaConnections

    We will continue to update the programme online.

    ‘Problems of Chronology in Gandharan Art’ will take place in Oxford on Thursday/Friday 23-24th March 2017. Attendance is free, but it is necessary to book a place by emailing us at: carc@classics.ox.ac.uk

    We also intend to have a live webcast of the event and issue it as a podcast at a later date. Details will be announced online.

    Best wishes,

    The Classical Art Research Centre

    Dr Peter Stewart

    Director, Classical Art Research Centre

    Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology

    University of Oxford/ Wolfson College
    Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies
    66 St Giles’, Oxford, OX1 3LU

    Tel: +44 (0)1865 278082

    Fax: +44 (0)1865 610237

  • ROMARCH: Oxford CARC Workshop on the Migration of Iconography in Classical Art

    Classical Art Research Centre Workshop 2017
    Oxford, 28-29th September, 2017

    Transmission: The Migration of Iconography in Classical Art
    Generously supported by Jean-David Cahn and Tony Michaels

    One hallmark of Greek and Roman art is the persistence of certain schemes of imagery and their movement between media and across space and time. For example, certain compositions of figures or mythological scenes, invented at particular times and places, enjoyed an extraordinary longevity and were reproduced across and beyond the Graeco-Roman world. The phenomenon is especially notable in the period of the Roman Empire, when the conditions of Roman rule enabled particular scenes and motifs to spread through Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East.

    This is not only a matter of individual figure types, gestures, iconographical attributes etc, the vocabulary of Graeco-Roman art. Often elaborate compositions were transmitted with a high degree of consistency through the traditions of painting, relief sculpture, mosaics, illustrated manuscripts, and the applied arts. Some mythological vignettes survived through many generations of artistic production and crossed from one medium to another. Some popular non-narrative scenes, like the so-called Totenmahl or ‘funerary banquet’ used in Hellenistic and Roman funerary art, also enjoyed popularity for centuries.

    In trying to understand such movements of imagery we have to discern them through fragmentary evidence and the processes are often unpredictable and obscure. Small, apparently incidental details may be faithfully reproduced across vast chronological and geographical spans, while in other ways the imagery is adapted to suit the purposes of those who made or used art in specific circumstances. This tension between the local purposes of ancient works of art and the big picture of the classical tradition, visible to the ‘all-seeing’ archaeologist offers an excellent opportunity for understanding how classical art worked at different levels of analysis.  Yet much remains obscure about the particular mechanisms by which iconography was transmitted, whether through artistic training, artists’ imitation of portable objects, or the hypothetical models known as ‘copy-books’ or ‘pattern-books’, which are often assumed to have existed, but for which there is little hard evidence.

    This workshop builds upon CARC’s recent events dedicated to Roman replicas and Greek artists. Through the contributions of international speakers and lively, informal debate, it will aim to cast new light on ancient imagery and on the lessons that can be learned from examining its adaptive success. The workshop will focus on mythological scenes (but not exclusively) and on Hellenistic and Roman periods (but not exclusively). Probable topics for discussion include: the evidence for and against ‘copy-books’; the transmission of imagery between luxury art and stone reliefs such as Roman mythological sarcophagi; the role of ceramics and plaster models as vehicles for transmission; mythological mosaics; the movement of imagery across Roman provinces; and the persistence of classical schemes in the illuminated manuscripts of Late Antiquity.

    Download The Abstract: www.beazley.ox.ac.uk/events/Transmission%20Abstract.pdf

    All are welcome! The workshop will be free, but it is necessary to book in advance by contacting carc@classics.ox.ac.uk

    Giles Richardson
    Administrative Assistant, Classical Art Research Centre
    University of Oxford

    Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies
    66 St Giles’, Oxford, OX1 3LU
    Tel: +44 (0)1865 278082
    Fax: +44 (0)1865 610237

  • ROMARCH: 2017 Archaeological Field School: Trasimeno (Italy)

    clg15_finalreportfig12The Trasimeno Archaeology Field School of the Umbra Institute in Perugia provides a curricular concentration in Archaeology and History based in Castiglione del Lago on the shores of Lake Trasimeno between Umbria and Tuscany.

    The Site 

    Castiglione del Lago is a charming medieval town in Umbria, located on top of a small peninsula along the southwestern shores of Lake Trasimeno.  A member of the prestigious I Borghi più Belli d’Italia Association (The Most Beautiful Villages in Italy, www.borghitalia.it), Castiglione lies among renowned historical cities, such as Orvieto, Chiusi, Arezzo, Cortona and Perugia. All Field School participants will stay in Castiglione during the summer term, only a few miles away from Perugia and easily accessible either by bus or train.

    The Academic Program

    The Field School consists of two courses, one theoretical and one practical, both held in Castiglione del Lago. The program aims to provide students with a comprehensive overview of up-to-date theories and methods of archaeological research and fieldwork as applied to the civilizations that shaped the history and culture of central Italy. The Field School runs for 6 weeks. Program dates for the summer 2017 will be May 27th (arrival in Italy) to July 8th (departure). 

    The course ARFW 350: Archaeological Field Workshop is an archaeology practicum. Students will work alongside professional archaeological staff to gain fundamental skills in archaeological research and apply them to the project.
    Course Credit: 3

    The course ARCL 340: Archaeology in Central Italy: The Etruscan and Roman Heritageintroduces students to the region’s history and heritage, and provides context for the archaeological research project.
    Course Credit: 3

    Both courses are non-prerequisite and mandatory. They include fieldtrips to various archaeological and cultural sites, including an overnight trip to Rome. Fieldtrips are designed to enhance student understanding of the territory’s history, while also providing the opportunity to study and visit neighboring archaeological sites and major museum collections.

    Click on the host website: http://www.umbra.org/academics/archaeology-summer/

    Or visit the project blog, including links to publications: https://archaeotrasimeno.wordpress.com

    Continue reading

  • ROMARCH: American Academy in Rome Summer School in Roman Pottery 2017

    potteryrome

    Application deadline extended to 17 February!

    SKILLS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: THE HOWARD COMFORT, FAAR’29, SUMMER SCHOOL IN ROMAN POTTERY STUDIES

    Potsherds constitute the most frequent group of finds on archaeological sites in the Mediterranean. Thus pottery studies form an essential part of any archaeological research project. Pottery usually offers the most important evidence for dating sites and provides a major source for studies ranging from trade relations and food consumption to questions of identity.

    The Summer School in Roman Pottery Studies is a four-week program designed to present the basics of Roman pottery studies, which can be gained only through direct contact with ceramic assemblages. As Rome had the most diversified pottery supply among sites in the ancient world, the AAR is well placed, through its own collections and other material deposited there, to teach a subject rarely offered in American universities. Since the School’s establishment in 2006 to honor the memory of Howard Comfort (a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome and an eminent scholar of Roman pottery), it has thus come to fill a need, gaining a reputation as the premier venue for introducing aspiring scholars to the field, and its alumni are increasingly in demand on projects in Italy and elsewhere.

    The course consists of two parts: the taught seminar, where students will learn the fundamentals of Roman pottery including single ceramic classes with their characteristics, function, date and provenience. This section will also include a variety of field trips and visits to major collections. In the second part the participants will apply their knowledge to an assemblage of ceramic Veii. This element is designed to give the participants practical experience by working on their own or in small groups under the supervision of the director.

    Continue reading

  • ROMARCH: AIA meeting 2018, call for papers, Dura-Europus colloquium

    aia
    Proposed “Colloquium Session” for AIA Annual Meeting

    Boston, January 4-7, 2018

    Archaeology from a distance: Dura-Europos in the new millennium

    Organizers/discussants:

    Dr. Jen Baird, Birkbeck College, University of London and Dr. Lisa Brody, Yale University Art Gallery

    We invite proposals for papers (15-20 minutes each) presenting research on the site of Dura-Europos and its multicultural heritage. Identified almost a century ago, Dura on the Syrian Euphrates is one of the most extensively excavated urban sites of the Arsacid and Roman Near East. While the site has been heavily looted during the current conflict in Syria, there is tremendous potential for new research and analysis of the site and its archaeology, including that which builds on the archives and objects from Dura held in the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery.

    This session aims to bring together international scholars working on Dura-Europos and we invite papers that investigate the site and address questions including:

    What is the status of Dura in the 21st century? How might Dura inform our understanding of the Roman Empire and its interaction with eastern cultures? How can the Dura archives and collection at Yale facilitate reinterpretation of existing theories and assumptions regarding culture in the Roman East? What are the potentials and pitfalls of working with ‘legacy’ data, especially when the site is no longer accessible to Western scholars?

    In order to participate, please submit an abstract (up to 400 words) to Jen Baird (j.baird@bbk.ac.uk) and Lisa Brody (lisa.brody@yale.edu) by February 24, 2017.  The abstracts are reviewed anonymously so attach a PDF or WORD document without your name and affiliation to your e-mail message.