• ROMARCH: American Academy in Rome Summer School in Roman Pottery 2017

    potteryrome

    Application deadline extended to 17 February!

    SKILLS IN ARCHAEOLOGY: THE HOWARD COMFORT, FAAR’29, SUMMER SCHOOL IN ROMAN POTTERY STUDIES

    Potsherds constitute the most frequent group of finds on archaeological sites in the Mediterranean. Thus pottery studies form an essential part of any archaeological research project. Pottery usually offers the most important evidence for dating sites and provides a major source for studies ranging from trade relations and food consumption to questions of identity.

    The Summer School in Roman Pottery Studies is a four-week program designed to present the basics of Roman pottery studies, which can be gained only through direct contact with ceramic assemblages. As Rome had the most diversified pottery supply among sites in the ancient world, the AAR is well placed, through its own collections and other material deposited there, to teach a subject rarely offered in American universities. Since the School’s establishment in 2006 to honor the memory of Howard Comfort (a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome and an eminent scholar of Roman pottery), it has thus come to fill a need, gaining a reputation as the premier venue for introducing aspiring scholars to the field, and its alumni are increasingly in demand on projects in Italy and elsewhere.

    The course consists of two parts: the taught seminar, where students will learn the fundamentals of Roman pottery including single ceramic classes with their characteristics, function, date and provenience. This section will also include a variety of field trips and visits to major collections. In the second part the participants will apply their knowledge to an assemblage of ceramic Veii. This element is designed to give the participants practical experience by working on their own or in small groups under the supervision of the director.

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  • ROMARCH: AIA meeting 2018, call for papers, Dura-Europus colloquium

    aia
    Proposed “Colloquium Session” for AIA Annual Meeting

    Boston, January 4-7, 2018

    Archaeology from a distance: Dura-Europos in the new millennium

    Organizers/discussants:

    Dr. Jen Baird, Birkbeck College, University of London and Dr. Lisa Brody, Yale University Art Gallery

    We invite proposals for papers (15-20 minutes each) presenting research on the site of Dura-Europos and its multicultural heritage. Identified almost a century ago, Dura on the Syrian Euphrates is one of the most extensively excavated urban sites of the Arsacid and Roman Near East. While the site has been heavily looted during the current conflict in Syria, there is tremendous potential for new research and analysis of the site and its archaeology, including that which builds on the archives and objects from Dura held in the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery.

    This session aims to bring together international scholars working on Dura-Europos and we invite papers that investigate the site and address questions including:

    What is the status of Dura in the 21st century? How might Dura inform our understanding of the Roman Empire and its interaction with eastern cultures? How can the Dura archives and collection at Yale facilitate reinterpretation of existing theories and assumptions regarding culture in the Roman East? What are the potentials and pitfalls of working with ‘legacy’ data, especially when the site is no longer accessible to Western scholars?

    In order to participate, please submit an abstract (up to 400 words) to Jen Baird (j.baird@bbk.ac.uk) and Lisa Brody (lisa.brody@yale.edu) by February 24, 2017.  The abstracts are reviewed anonymously so attach a PDF or WORD document without your name and affiliation to your e-mail message.

     

  • ROMARCH: Call for Participants, Excavations at Roman Carsulae (Italy), 2017

    Excavating the Baths at Carsulae

    EXCAVATIONS OF THE BATHS AT ROMAN CARSULAE (ITALY)

    June 11 – July 22, 2017

    We are accepting applications from students and volunteers to participate in our eleventh season of the excavations of the baths at Roman Carsulae. The application deadline is Friday, March 31, 2017.

    Our goal for the 2017 season is to complete the excavation of the portion of the baths that lies beneath the protective roof in preparation for an intensive conservation plan that will ultimately encompass the entire bath complex.  We will also explore the area immediately to the east in order to determine the dimensions and function of two partially exposed rooms.

    The field program welcomes both students and volunteers. No experience is necessary, only an enthusiasm for archaeology and the ability to work hard in rigorous conditions.  Participants are instructed in excavation strategies, techniques and recording, the formulation of research questions and priorities, identification and handling of artifacts, drafting of site plans, and analytical rendering. Throughout the season, participants are given the opportunity to work with our conservators in the lab cleaning and consolidating small finds, or in the field helping to conserve the mosaics we have discovered over the course of the excavations.

    For further details such as cost, housing and the schedule, and to apply, please visit our website:  http://ww2.valdosta.edu/~jwhitehe/Carsulaeweb/Carsulae_home.htm.

    For questions, email us at ebarc.it@gmail.com.

    Thank you.

    Jane K. Whitehead, Director of the Excavations of the Baths at Roman Carsulae

    Professor Emerita, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Valdosta State University

  • ROMARCH: New publication: Greek and Roman terracottas

    BCH_Supp_54_Livre .indb

    A new book has just been published in France that deals with Greek and Roman
    terracottas. Its title:

    A. Muller/E. Lafli (eds.), Figurines de terre cuite en Méditerranée
    grecque et romaine. Vol 1: Production, diffusion, étude. École française
    d’Athènes, Bulletin de correspondance hellénique, supplément 54
    (Paris/Athens, École française d’Athènes 2016). Pp. 517; ISBN:
    978-2-86958-274-3.

    Address for orders: École française d’Athènes, 6, Odos Didotou,
    Kolonaki, GR-10680 Athens.
    Tel.: +30.210.367 99 22.
    E-mail: marina.leclercq@efa.gr

    Vol. II of the same book was already out in 2015 (for its review: A.
    Queyrel Bottineau, Revue des études anciennes 118/2, 2016. 632-635).

    Hoping to welcoming you in Lydia Symposium in May 2017;
    best wishes from Turkey,

    Ergun LAFLI
    https://deu.academia.edu/ErgunLAFLI

  • Archaeological Field School – Vicus Martis Tudertium

    Colleagues,

    As the semester winds to a close, I wanted to let you know that we are currently accepting applications to our 2017 summer archaeological field school in Umbria at the site of the Vicus Martis Tudertium.

    Lots more info (including a link to the application page and some nice photos) available here:

    http://www.users.drew.edu/jmuccigr/vicusadmartis/

    And here is the institutional page at Drew.

    Please share with any interested students.

     

    Thank you and happy end of term!

    John Muccigrosso
    jmuccigr@drew.edu

  • ROMARCH: Journal of Ancient History, CFP and TOC for 2016.4

    CALL FOR PAPERS

    The Journal of Ancient History continues to invite submissions of articles. We are committed to a speedy process from submission to publication while maintaining high standards of peer-review.

    Please see our website for submission information:
    http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jah

    Papers published in 2016:

    JAH 4 (2016)

    Marc Van De Mieroop, “The Madness of King Rusa: the psychology of despair in eighth century Assyria”

    Kevin Clinton, “The Eleusinian Anaktoron of Demeter and Kore: dedicated to Inscriptiones Graecae on the occasion of its 200th Anniversary”

    Benedikt Eckhardt, “The Seleucid Administration of Judea, the High
    Priesthood and the Rise of the Hasmoneans”

    Andrew R. Krause, “Diaspora Synagogues, Leontopolis, and the Other Jewish Temples of Egypt in the Histories of Josephus”

    Daniel J. Crosby, “The Case for Another Son of P. Quinctilius Varus: a
    re-examination of the textual and scholarly traditions around Joseph. BJ 2.68 and AJ 17.288”

    Philip Kaplan, “The Ring of Polycrates: friendship and alliance in the
    east Mediterranean”

    Marleen K. Termeer, “Roman colonial coinages beyond the city-state: a view from the Samnite world”

    Lauren Kinnee, “The Trophy Tableau Monument in Rome: from Marius to Caecilia Metella”

    Anna McGrail, “Pupil Punishment: corporal discipline in Roman education”

    ———————-
    Gary D. Farney
    Editor, Journal of Ancient History
    Associate Professor, Department of History
    Rutgers University (Newark)
    gfarney@rutgers.edu
    Webpage: http://www.ncas.rutgers.edu/gary-d-farney
    JAH Website: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jah
    Archaeological Field School Website: http://fieldschool.rutgers.edu